proudly presenting inspirational shows and lectures on art and anthroposophy

opening receptions

Gallery

marty levin and tom klein: sacred geometry enlivening space

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Intricate and complex, Tom’s Klein’s string art on our walls and Marty Levin’s geometric sculptures hanging from the ceiling complemented one another and the Art Hall space beautifully at their opening on Thursday, March 08th. Shadowed patterns on the walls beckoned the viewer to look more deeply into the beauty of the mathematics.

Marty and his wife, Judy, spent at least ten hours installing the cables and then hanging all the sculptures one long Saturday. Tom was more fortunate that our hanging system, already in place on the walls, completely supported his string art mounted on heavy wood—a much simpler installation.

At their opening both artists passionately shared their research and process that went into creating these marvelous scientific and artistic pieces to a warm, receptive and inquisitive audience. We are very grateful to Tom and Marty for their effort and generosity in exhibiting this unique work. They have both agreed to keep the exhibit on display through May.

If you or someone you know is interested in learning more about geometry in relation to this exhibit both artists are available to teach. The string art pieces are for sale or available to order. Please contact Robin Lieberman for any inquiries at 503-222-1192 or robin@robinlieberman.net.

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Gallery

laura summer: blessings

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Well, we did it! We managed our Dispersal of Laura Summer’s vibrant paintings even though Laura couldn’t be present. Luckily, Laura sent a lovely YouTube video in which she spoke about Dispersal and the joy of painting for us.

An intimate group enjoyed the grand, evening opportunity to socialize surrounded by healing, colorful paintings. About half the 30 pieces were dispersed, so the opportunity to become a steward of an original Laura Summer artwork still awaits you!

Anytime you want to view the work during school hours just ring the bell at Cedarwood and someone will show you to The Art Hall. Otherwise, feel free to make an appointment with Robin, our director, and she will gladly work with you. Laura’s wish is for all the paintings to be dispersed so they can do their healing work in their new homes.

We also introduced Ryley Wheeler, Cedarwood student and Robin’s mentee for his 8th grade project, a significant part of which involves creating the fliers announcing the exhibits. Almost five years ago Ryley won the school-wide naming contest for our gallery, so he had an early hand helping The Art Hall come into being!

Two of our former gallery artists were instrumental in installing the exhibit: Jannebeth Röell and Patricia Lynch. Robin is indebted for their open willingness to help! (And this is really an exceptionally well displayed exhibit!) Also, a big thank you to regulars, Ruthi Klein and Judy Levin, for graciously tending to the Dispersal and Donation tables.

Please look for another update to follow, as the Gospel of St John two-day workshop was also a grand event! We will install work from ten of the participants soon in The Art Hall with another soft opening: an opportunity to consider becoming a steward of one or more of the remaining works—Dispersal Portland 2018 Two!


Gallery

jacqueline freeman: a peek behind the veil

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Like bees to the hive, visitors buzzed around The Art Hall to meet Jacqueline Freeman and hear her colorful story of encountering and photographing the Elementals on her farm. Indeed, it was a sweet night!

The event shared the evening with Cedarwood’s Back to School Night, which made for a very full house, rich with a variety of interest, and two beautiful hospitality tables.

Jacqueline is a natural storyteller: she speaks from her heart and soul of her own experiences. She lives as part of nature and has a keen awareness of the nature spirits and listens to them carefully. “You could feel the exuberance when the Undines were happy with the (new) pool of water.” She respectfully asked each plant that she photographed to guide her…the message being “look in between.”

Well…given that the nature spirits are beings that do live in between the physical and the spiritual world, Jacqueline really paid close attention! She learned how to Photoshop and “naively” split and reflected the images of her plants and indeed, there they were, in between.

Frightened by the intensity late one night while looking at the screen, Jacqueline closed her computer and didn’t look again for a while. The spirits then stopped showing themselves to her and so she began to apologize in an almost prayer-like manner for “shutting them out”, asking for their forgiveness and for them to appear again. Eventually they did and this exhibit is an honoring of these beings.

Jacqueline captivated the audience with her further description of the healing properties of many of the images on display. And Jacqueline generously came back to The Art Hall two days later, Saturday morning, to share stories of Flower Fairies to a transfixed group of children and parents alike.

Several of the hanging images have been sold. The exhibit will remain open until Thursday, November 09, 2017. A portion of sales will be donated by the artist to The Art Hall in support of its mission to share art created out of the spiritual impulse of anthroposophy, keeping art alive into the future.

All photos courtesy of Cedarwood parents, Ben McLeod (DBM) or Linda Brown (LKB).


Gallery

katie montgomery: bees as teachers

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“This is a time to honor the bees together and share our stories. Close your eyes and reflect on their gifts. Please turn to your neighbor, as we’re all part of community, and share an encounter with bees that you’ve had in your life.” And that’s how Katie Montgomery kicked off her personal and intimate presentation on her exhibit!

Katie went on to describe the strong kindred spirit she feels with these sacred messengers; the bees are our modern day alchemists, hard working and beautiful (like Katie)! It all started in around the time she was in college, when she gradually noticed the activity and life of the bees while doing field research (literally…in a field). Her perceptions sharpened, her observational process like Goethean phenomenology, learning to slow down and listen in wonder, like a child, the bees teaching her about themselves. Katie also shared her own mystical bee story, the medicine of the bees, a lesson about attachment and letting go.

All the photos in the exhibit are those bees she met in Portland over the last eight years. Only seven of the gorgeously-framed, sensitive images of the original seventeen are still available. You can contact Katie to purchase any of these seven or unframed images for $50 and 6” square cards for $6 each (or four for $20). All prints are of exceptional quality. Please contact Katie directly at 818-605-2071.

A special thank you to professional photographer, Kristal Passie, and also a dear friend of Katie’s, for capturing the warmth and beauty of the evening.


Gallery

regional sketch group exhibition 2017: imagination and inspiration

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This unusual exhibit is the first of its kind for the Art Hall. Rather than displaying finished works our artists from the Regional Artists Sketch Group were asked to share their sketches, their research, allowing us a glimpse at their processes. (Frame a sketch you say? Why yes! We see many framed sketches of great artists’ work in museums!) The resulting show reveals varied qualities of the artists and their work: imagination, inspiration, courage, beauty, love, devotion, joy, perseverance, community, and even the alchemical merging of earthly and cosmic forces, to name just a few.

The works invite the viewer to participate in our artists’ processes as they investigated nature, working from Rudolf Steiner’s Nine Nature Sketches for Artists for guidance. While one can see some similarities in the various artists’ work, the differences are equally apparent and illuminating. Whether viewing a large single motif or a series of smaller sketches elaborating upon a theme, an abstract work or something more representational, one can experience the living quality of color in the range of possibilities.

Wade Cavin, High School Life Sciences and Mathematics teacher at Portland Waldorf School, enriched the understanding and appreciation of those fortunate to be present at the opening reception through his eloquent and clear presentation, briefly and impressionistically summarized below, including a description of each of the nine sketches which came out of Wade’s meditation on prints of Steiner’s work.

These first three express spiritual warmth and light, followed by the gradual emergence of earthly influences, death, and then a harmonic integration of all.

  • Sketch #1: the main thing: it is a warm color sketch
  • Sketch #2: the Sun; what was orange is now red, and some blue appears
  • Sketch #3: blue now surrounds the cosmic image…the Sun…the moon phase
  • Sketch #4: earthly; nothing cosmic; green and a mysterious yellow/orange (warmth again) streaming through, with some brown flat green.
  • Sketch #5: appearance of black (death), with yellow and greens in the trees; lifeless black below, warmth in the trees
  • Sketch #6: both earthly and heavenly qualities; enter a strange blue
  • Sketch #7: more earthly brown; the cosmic is now entering the earth; the alchemical merging of cosmos and earth has a circular aspect
  • Sketch #8: sunrise 2; a cosmic sun on the horizon like #7, with a triangle, often the symbol of light, while the circle is warmth
  • Sketch #9: we achieve harmonic composition

The original works of Steiner invite us to delve more deeply into our own capacity for imagination and inspiration. Color is not just physical; it also has a spiritual component, a subjective quality that comes through the spiritual world. How do we approach this and know what’s going on; how do we engage with our consciousness, other than simply feeling?

Steiner told us that in the future we will be able to see color not attached to an object. So, what’s out there in nature? For example, what is this black telling us? How can I work with the warmth quality, life quality (green), with lively blue all around them? How do we develop the new eye for these; how does warmth turn into light…and into death? How can we be inspired by color into this new sensing? What is inspiring us into color can really change our level of inspiration.”

The works will hang through February 23. We invite you to see this interesting and compelling exhibit, preferably by appointment, with Robin Lieberman (503-222-1192) or one of the artists. And if you are interested in purchasing a piece, please contact the same.

Portland Group

  • Wade Cavin
  • Carrie Gibbons
  • James Lee
  • Patricia Homan Lynch
  • Jannebeth Roell

Eugene Group

  • Barbora Bakalarova
  • Phyllis Helland
  • Kathy Reardon
  • Marcia Seymour

Corvallis/Eugene

  • Laurie McCloskey

And last, thank you to Patricia Homan Lynch, one of the artists, for taking up the work of matting and framing many of these works and, once again, for her keen eye in hanging the exhibit!


Gallery

REGIONAL SKETCH GROUP EXHIBITION POSTPONED UNTIL FRIDAY, 5:00 PM, JANUARY 27 due to emergency weather conditions.


Gallery

valerie miles: working out of anthroposophy

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A loving crowd representing various periods in Valerie Miles’s career as teacher and artist here in Portland attended her opening reception for Playing with Color, Rhythm and Form: students, from high school seniors who were in her last 8th grade class at the Micha-el School to a fourth grader who had Valerie in her first year; parents of students; Waldorf teacher colleagues; artists; other professionals in our community; and her ever-present husband and partner in life, John—all eager to hear her eloquent presentation amidst her gorgeous and riveting works of art.

Valerie took to the podium with the familiarity, ease and confidence of a professional. She began her inspiring presentation declaring that her life’s work comes out of anthroposophy and how out of personal tragedy, losing someone very close, she came to work with color, learning from the well-known German painter, Karo Bergman. In this relationship (Karo spoke no English and Valerie spoke no German!) they communicated through the being and essence of color. After this time in Germany Valerie and her family returned to England, enrolled their children in a Waldorf School, and John and she began their training. She told us that Waldorf Education contains every aspect of anthroposophy and has the power to heal and change lives, most of that streaming through the Arts.

Valerie delighted us with a story of awareness, explaining how one of her teachers once said, “an artist should not be a teacher”. Her reflections:

That’s an interesting concept and I had never thought about it before. Now I can think about it…I like it! Why did she say that? I think as an artist now I can just start to feel the communication that I need to bring the forces, and what I see behind those forces, and bring them into the Arts. When you’re a teacher you’re always preparing, marking, giving out, going to meetings…You can’t hold that space, not if you’re a Waldorf teacher. I’m just about getting to that place. But what I found most of all, most satisfying, and this has always been so, ever since the work with Karo Bergman and later at Tobias School of Art, and (with) many other teachers: that power of color.

We’re forgetting what’s in our environment…what’s God-given, if you like, what sustains us. The power of color, all that rhythm that lives, how it changes…This is why I’ve always been so fascinated by the seasons and what’s happening.

Sharing her process Valerie said: I’m a very fair weather artist and I have to be in the mood. But I’m getting past that a bit…If I feel inspired I just take a color—any color—and put it on paper and then another color and another and I just play with them; I literally play with them and hope—there’s a lot of trust involved here— “is something going to turn out?” And fortunately, a lot of times it does work! It’s a trust process.

Most telling, a child in the captive audience asked a question at the end of Valerie’s presentation “What inspires you?” Valerie’s beautiful response was “children, like you, who are closest to the spiritual world.”

Thank you, Valerie, for your dedication to the Arts, anthroposophy, your impeccably executed work, and a most beautiful exhibit at the Art Hall! Many, many beings received the healing power of the color you shared. We hope you’ll come back!